JCC TImeline

1845
1845

The Beginning

The Jewish community of Wyoming Valley starts with the formation of B’nai B’rith congregation.

1847
1847

New Temple

Temple B’nai B’rith is built on South Washington Street in Wilkes-Barre as a Reform congregation by early German-Jewish residents.

1854
1854

17th

Wilkes-Barre is listed as the 17th oldest Jewish community in the territories.

1875
1875

The Long Family

Many Jews become merchants to the coal industry. Among the first are members of the Long family. Their estate becomes the site of the present Jewish Community Center Day Camp.

1885
1885

Elderly Housing

Temple B’nai B’rith opens Temple B’nai B’rith housing for the elderly, which provides federally subsidized apartments for low-income senior citizens.

1892
1892

Ungarishe Synagogue

Congregation Ohav Zedek Anshe Ungran (Lover of Righteousness, Men of Hungary) is formed by Austrian-Hungarian immigrants. The Congregation
builds the Ungarishe Synagogue on Canal Street, which is now Pennsylvania Avenue, in 1902 and moves to their present site in 1932.

1918
1918

YMHA

The Young Men’s Hebrew Association (YMHA) opens and becomes the hub of Jewish social and cultural activity.

1922
1922

Temple Israel

Temple Israel is initiated as a Conservative congregation and dedicates their building in 1925.

1932
1932

Home Camp

Julia Lieberman creates Home Camp at the YMHA (summer day camp for children ages 9-15).

1933
1933

S. J. Strauss Lodge

The S. J. Strauss Lodge is formed to help the jobless, promote Americanism, and fight anti-Semitism. The lodge later builds the B’nai B’rith apartments for low-income residents.

1946
1946

Shoemaker Property

The Y acquires the Shoemaker property on South River Street as the site of the new YMHA and changes its name to the Jewish Community Center of the Wyoming Valley in 1947. Home Camp moves to Twin Lakes site in Dallas, PA.

1953
1953

K’Ton Ton

K’Ton Ton camp is created for kindergarten children at JCC.

1955
1955

United Orthodox Synagogue

Four Orthodox congregations merge to form United Orthodox Synagogue. JCC opens on South River Street after five years of construction.

1960
1960

United Hebrew Institute

United Hebrew Institute (UHI) is formed and moves the Israel Ben Zion Academy to Kingston to accommodate the growing Jewish population there. A mikvah is built adjacent to UHI. Congregation B’nai B’rith relocates to their current home in Kingston, combining modern architecture with the original altar, pews, and candelabra.

1962
1962

Holiday House

JCC day camp moves to Holiday House estate.

1972
1972

Flood Emergency Committee

The Jewish community forms the Flood Emergency Committee, providing individual financial and psychological help and restoration of local Jewish institutions after tropical storm Agnes.

1976
1976

Preschool at Camp

Preschool groups are added to the JCC day camp.

1992
1992

JCC Rehabilitation

The JCC rehabilitation fund increases access to the JCC and provides Jewish Family Service with a separate building. JCC undergoes a $2.3 million rehabilitation, adding a parking lot, new entry, and improvements to the fitness center.

1993
1993

Rifkin Resource Center

The Rifkin Resource Center is dedicated to provide Judaic educational materials to the community.

2013
2013

JCA

The Jewish Community Alliance is created through a merger of various Jewish agencies, including Jewish Family Service, Jewish Federation, and the Jewish Community Center.

2019
2019

New Friedman JCC

The Jcc moved to the new Friedman JCC building at 613 S.J. Strauss Lane, Kingston, PA.